Wind

Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest Rose 358% in One Year

According to IMAZON's (Amazon Institute of People and the Environment) latest SAD report referring to last June, which measures and studies the phenomenon of deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest, 843 square kilometers of deforestation have been discovered, with a 30% cloud covering in the territory. This represents an increase of 358% in deforestation in relation to June 2013, when deforestation was 184 square kilometers and a cloud coverage around 12%.

The accumulated deforestation in the period of August 2013 and June 2014, corresponding to the first eleven months in the actual deforestation calendar, has totaled 1,690 square kilometers. This represents a reduction in the accumulated deforestation by 9%, in relation to the previous period (August 2012 to June 2013), when the data showed a deforestation of 1,855 square kilometers.

Last month, the period over which this report focuses on, the majority (54%) of the deforestation happened in Pará, followed by Amazonas (16%), Rondônia (15%), Mato Grosso (14%) and Acre (1%).

The degraded forests summed up to 48 square kilometers last June which, comparing to June 2013, means a reduction of 71%, as there was a total of 169 square kilometers of degraded forests back then. The degradation of forests happened in Pará (44%), Rondônia (40%), Mato Grosso (13%) and Amazonas (2%).

The accumulated forest degradation, over the period from August 2013 and June 2014, has totaled 614 square kilometers, a reduction of fifty-eight percent in relation to the previous period, which went from August 2012 to June 2013. Here, the numbers showed 1,462 square kilometers of forest degradation.

Rounding up, these numbers show yet some concerning stats, like the increased activity registered last month, but also bring some positive insights as the drop in accumulated deforestation and forest degradation, which are probably related to Brazil's efforts in the forest conservation.

However, there is still much to be done. The Amazon rainforest is a world's treasure and it keeps being slaughtered each week, in a phenomenon that seems to be endless.

Diogo Costa

About Diogo Costa

Biologist, writer, tech guy, musician and photographer. Only the first is for real, though.

Diogo Costa

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